fionastaples:

ryanlangdraws:

I’ve had people insist that I used 3d an photos, despite my assertion that I haven’t. You can see the thread here http://www.reddit.com/r/comicbooks/comments/2ag3ku/this_is_a_painting_iron_man_by_ryan_lang/ But this isn’t for them. This is for people that like to see the process of an illustration. I tried to break it down, but if there are any questions, please ask. I have no problem with artists using photos or 3d in their digital work, so when I say I didn’t use photos or 3d for this image, it was that I wanted to see what I could accomplish on my own (with a couple of filters at the end). And if after this process post people still refuse to believe that I didn’t use photos or 3d….. I will take that as a compliment.

These process shots are a precious gift. Super informative!

travisellisor:

splash page from Marvel Comics Presents #79 by Barry Windsor-Smith


I wish we can see more BWS art

travisellisor:

splash page from Marvel Comics Presents #79 by Barry Windsor-Smith

I wish we can see more BWS art

(via themarvelageofcomics)

johnbyrnedraws:

Marvel Team-Up #67, page 10 by John Byrne & Dave Hunt. 1978.

johnbyrnedraws:

Marvel Team-Up #67, page 10 by John Byrne & Dave Hunt. 1978.

(via themarvelageofcomics)

steampunktendencies:

House of Scientists, Lviv, Ukraine (by lukasz mlodzinski)

steampunktendencies:

House of Scientists, Lviv, Ukraine (by lukasz mlodzinski)

marvel1980s:

1980 - Captain America #247 colour guides

(via themarvelageofcomics)

cinephiliabeyond:

“In 2001, you know, the best things in the film are the machines, which are much more splendid than the idiotic humans. In Red Desert, I also confronted this technology and these machines with human beings who are morally and psychologically retarded and thus utterly unable to cope with modern life.” —Interview with Michelangelo Antonioni in Rome, July 29, 1969
“In 1964, Antonioni made his first color film, elegantly controlling his palate in Red Desert, and when Blow-Up came two years later, he became notorious for color perfectionism in deciding the grass wasn’t green enough; he had it painted, and also a road, and a building. ‘Antonioni paints the grass!’ he told me in a 1969 interview. ‘To some degree, all directors paint and arrange or change things on a location, and it amused me that so much was made of it in my case.’” —Michelangelo Antonioni: In Memory by Roger Ebert
Here’s a stunning press kit for Red Desert, Antonioni’s first venture into the world of color, courtesy of CineFiles. Included is a rather dense essay by Antonioni written exclusively for the press kit. You can purchase the original at Royal Books.

Gente del Po — which is available as a supplement on Criterion Collection special edition of Antonioni’s Red Desert — is a hushed, evocative, eleven-minute sketch of the daily toils of fishermen on the River Po. Even in this minor-key debut, with its plangent, gorgeous compositions, you can see the seeds of Antonioni’s style. “Everything that I made afterwards, either good or bad, starts from there, from this film on the River Po,” the director once said. Watch the entire film below.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

“In 2001, you know, the best things in the film are the machines, which are much more splendid than the idiotic humans. In Red Desert, I also confronted this technology and these machines with human beings who are morally and psychologically retarded and thus utterly unable to cope with modern life.” Interview with Michelangelo Antonioni in Rome, July 29, 1969

“In 1964, Antonioni made his first color film, elegantly controlling his palate in Red Desert, and when Blow-Up came two years later, he became notorious for color perfectionism in deciding the grass wasn’t green enough; he had it painted, and also a road, and a building. ‘Antonioni paints the grass!’ he told me in a 1969 interview. ‘To some degree, all directors paint and arrange or change things on a location, and it amused me that so much was made of it in my case.’” Michelangelo Antonioni: In Memory by Roger Ebert

Here’s a stunning press kit for Red Desert, Antonioni’s first venture into the world of color, courtesy of CineFiles. Included is a rather dense essay by Antonioni written exclusively for the press kit. You can purchase the original at Royal Books.

Gente del Po — which is available as a supplement on Criterion Collection special edition of Antonioni’s Red Desert — is a hushed, evocative, eleven-minute sketch of the daily toils of fishermen on the River Po. Even in this minor-key debut, with its plangent, gorgeous compositions, you can see the seeds of Antonioni’s style. “Everything that I made afterwards, either good or bad, starts from there, from this film on the River Po,” the director once said. Watch the entire film below.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

brianmichaelbendis:

Mike Deodato, Jr. ~ Avengers Icons: Tigra
The top is a promo PinUp, followed by the covers of #s 1-4.

thiagosts:

Alien - The Illustrated Story

(Published by Titan Books in 2012. Originally published by Heavy Metal Communications in 1979)

Written by Archie Goodwin

Art by Walt Simonson

Coloring by Walt Simonson, Louise Simonson, Deborah Pedlar, Polly Law and Bob Lerose

Lettering & Design by Jonh Workman

Edited by Charles Lippincott

"In space no one can hear you scream."

(via toxicnotebook)

Part of the art of making change happen is seeing which cultural tropes are past their prime and having the guts to invent new ones. Seth Godin on the clichés of visual communication, which succumb to the same cultural pitfalls as language clichés. (via explore-blog)

steampunktendencies:

Model : Valeriya Peshkova - Photographer : Margarita Kareva